------art_23176_11106981.1146529676216
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Disposition: inline

Not sure about the ATs. even if I don't mind them that much... if I unfocus
my eyes they look like bullet points ;-)

I have got this one working.. see if you can guess how..

recipe "eggs and bacon" do
  eggs = [2,:big]
  bacon = 3
the end

I posted my solution here:
http://liquiddevelopment.blogspot.com/2006/04/way-of-meta-part-iv-hijacking-local.html

On 5/2/06, Ross Bamford <rossrt / roscopeco.co.uk> wrote:
>
> On Tue, 2006-05-02 at 05:11 +0900, chiaro scuro wrote:
> > On 5/1/06, Jacob Fugal <lukfugl / gmail.com> wrote:
> > >
> > > On 5/1/06, chiaro scuro <kiaroskuro / gmail.com> wrote:
> > > > I need to keep the equal signs.
> > >
> > > This is my big question; why do you need the equal signs? I see
> > > nothing inherent about the "recipe" domain that makes the equal signs
> > > necessary or even desirable. If you were willing to ditch them, a
> > > whole slew of simpler and cleaner implementations are available.
> > >
> > I realize that would make it much easier in ruby.
> > It's just that the equal signs make lots of sense to my DSL users.
> (forget
> > the recipes, it's just an example)
>
> In return for keeping the equals signs, would the users let you get away
> with a few 'at' symbols?
>
> def recipe(name, &blk)
>   o = Object.new
>   o.instance_eval(&blk)
>   o.instance_variables.inject({}) do |h,s|
>     h[s[1..-1]] = o.instance_variable_get(s)
>     h
>   end
> end
> # => nil
>
> recipe "eggs and bacon" do
>   @eggs = [2,:big]
>   @bacon = 3
> end
> # => {"bacon"=>3, "eggs"=>[2, :big]}
>
> (Though I'd really recommend most of the other ideas from this thread
> over this).
>
> --
> Ross Bamford - rosco / roscopeco.REMOVE.co.uk
>
>
>


--
Chiaroscuro
---
Liquid Development: http://liquiddevelopment.blogspot.com/

------art_23176_11106981.1146529676216--