Jesse M wrote:
> Well I see something like,
> 
> lass Numeric
>      def positive?
>        self > 0
>      end
>    end

I assume you understand this from Pine's LtP.

>    [1, 2, 3].all? &:positive?  => true
>    [-1, 2, 3].all? &:positive? => false
> 
> which i don't understand half of it :) and i'm really gung hoe about it!

Have you tried typing this into IRB? I think you'll find it doesn't even
work.

The & symbol is used to get a Proc from a block passed into a method

  class Array
    def eachEven(&wasABlock_nowAProc)  # from LtP Online Chapter 10
  ...

or to convert a Proc into a block when _calling_ a method

  f = proc do |oddBall|
    puts oddBall.to_s+' is NOT an even number!'
  end
  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5].eachEven &f

:positive? is a symbol, so it can't be converted into a block:

all? and positive? are just methods (methods can end in !, =, or ?).

irb(main):001:0> [1,2,3].all? &:positive?
TypeError: wrong argument type Symbol (expected Proc)
        from (irb):1

Then, the "=> true" and "=> false" aren't actually Ruby code, they're
just meant to show the reader the value of that expression. Usually we
put a # in front so it's valid Ruby code:

  positive = proc {|n| n > 0 }
  [1, 2, 3].all? &positive   #=> true
  [-1, 2, 3].all? &positive  #=> false

Do you follow that (working) rewrite of the snippet? If you type it into
IRB, you should see the results listed after the "#=>".

Anyway, for further reading, I recommend Why's (Poignant) Guide to Ruby
if you can deal with reading a wacky story in between learning more Ruby.

http://www.poignantguide.net/ruby/

Or there's the standard reference, the Pickaxe.

Or you can just ask the list when you have a question!

All the best!
Dave