--- Randy Kramer <rhkramer / gmail.com> wrote:

> On Monday 17 April 2006 10:09 pm, Jake McArthur wrote:
> > Linux GUI:
> > 	gedit: Just a typical text editor. Nothing too special in my book.
> > Lacks the ability to automagically update if the file is altered by
> > some external process. Not sure about Ruby highlighting; I've mostly
> > used this for other languages.
> > 	kwrite: Also typical, but has one up over gedit in my book in that
> > it will update to the latest version of the file written to disk if
> > it is changed. Very beneficial since I use version management. Like
> > gedit, I don't recall programming in Ruby in kwrite.
> 
> I like nedit.  It does recognize when a file (on disk) is altered by some 
> other process and offers to open it.  I'm not sure I'd want it to open it 
> automagically.  Has macros, syntax highlighting, can record keystrokes to 
> create macros.  Doesn't directly support folding, but I and several others 
> have written pseudo-folding macros for various purposes.  (Mine are for 
> folding TWiki marked up text.)
> 
> Randy Kramer
> 

I like NEdit pretty well. It has almost everything you'd want except for a
class/method browser, a GUI debugger, and font anti-aliasing (uses bitmapped X
fonts). Note that it's strictly X11-based. Besides on GNU/Linux, I've used it
on a Mac (with Apple's X11) and on Windows (with Cygwin's X) and it worked fine
for me. It's got its own "macro language" that looks pretty simple.

You can find the Ruby syntax highlighting patterns for NEdit here:
http://www.nedit.org/ftp/contrib/highlighting/ruby.pats
(Instructions for how to install them are in that file at the top.)

Looking into FreeRIDE presently.


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