Le 14 avr. 06, 00:50, Eric Armstrong a ˝─rit :

> Thanks. It must be standard on unix systems. All those
> years wasted mastering Data General technologies...
> Sigh.
> :_)

That's why I put quotes around standard. To exaggerate a bit: standard  
is in the eyes of the beholder :)

Guillaume.

>
> Guillaume Marcais wrote:
>> Note that this is fairly "standard" and exists also in C. From the  
>> man page of exit() on Linux:
>> DESCRIPTION
>>        The  exit()  function causes normal program termination and  
>> the the value of
>>        status & 0377 is returned to the parent (see wait(2)).  All  
>> functions regis-
>>        tered  with  atexit() and on_exit() are called in the reverse  
>> order of their
>>        registration, and all open streams are flushed and closed.   
>> Files created by
>>        tmpfile() are removed.
>> Guillaume.
>> Le 10 avr. 06, 19:47, Eric Armstrong a ˝─rit :
>>> Most excellent. How on earth did you find that?
>>> How did you know to look for it, orginally?
>>>
>>> Or did you just happen to stumble across it while
>>> persuing API docs using ri?? (In which case, that
>>> would seem to be the thing to do!)
>>>
>>> Logan Capaldo wrote:
>>>> On Apr 7, 2006, at 9:10 PM, Eric Armstrong wrote:
>>>>> That's looking like a cool solution. What is that
>>>>> at_exit thing, btw? Is that a standard part of rake
>>>>> I should know about?
>>>> at_exit is a standard part of ruby
>>>> % ri at_exit
>>>> ---------------------------------------------------------  
>>>> Kernel#at_exit
>>>>      at_exit { block } -> proc
>>>> -------------------------------------------------------------------- 
>>>> ----
>>>>      Converts block to a Proc object (and therefore binds it at the
>>>>      point of call) and registers it for execution when the program
>>>>      exits. If multiple handlers are registered, they are executed  
>>>> in
>>>>      reverse order of registration.
>>>>         def do_at_exit(str1)
>>>>           at_exit { print str1 }
>>>>         end
>>>>         at_exit { puts "cruel world" }
>>>>         do_at_exit("goodbye ")
>>>>         exit
>>>>      produces:
>>>>         goodbye cruel world
>>>
>>>
>
>