BTW I asked since what you did there kinda, sorta, makes sense in
Python. But not in Ruby.

On 3/21/06, Alder Green <alder.green / gmail.com> wrote:
> The guide is cute, but I wouldn't recommend it as an actual tutorial.
> Try Chris Pine's tut, or better yet the pickaxe2.
>
> There are a lot of ways to store structured data in Ruby. The most
> common way in real world usage is plaintext mark format, like Yaml.
> Google Yaml and read about it (somewhat like XML, only usually nicer
> but less powerful).
>
> The other common way is Marshal:
>
> http://ruby-doc.org/core/classes/Marshal.html
>
> which makes sense sometimes.
>
> On 3/21/06, James Whittaker <jmwhittaker / gmail.com> wrote:
> > Alder Green wrote:
> > > Any Python experience by any chance? :)
> > >
> > > In wordlist.rb you create a *local variable* code_words. When you
> > > require wordlist.rb, locals variable get created, then destroyed. Only
> > > constants (classes, modules) survive. So you can either store that
> > > hash as a constant (inside a module/class), or (cleaner, more
> > > sensible) store it in some sort of serial representation format, e.g.
> > > Yaml.
> > >
> > > Alder Green
> >
> > Thanks, but no no Python experience!
> >
> > Bit of a flaw in the book then at only chapter 4!! If the code does not
> > work as described.
> >
> > It seems quite sensible what i'm trying to do, don't quite understand
> > your YAML format, but basically how can I store variables, hashes etc in
> > an external file then call them.
> >
> > This book has been praised but has anyone really tried the code?
> >
> > --
> > Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
> >
> >
>
>