I like to use TextMate (www.macromates.com) and simply just save
a file in your home directory called .bash_profile

You would add something like this too it.

export PATH="/usr/local/bin/:$PATH"

But honestly, I thought /usr/local/bin was part of the default path,  
and ahh, I see below it is. Do you know where you installed ruby? If  
so, that it what you would put in your $PATH environment. BTW, if you  
do install DarwinPorts (which is a nice idea) then you will do  
something like this in your .bash_profile

export PATH="/opt/local/bin:$PATH"
export MANPATH="/opt/local/share/man:$MANPATH"
export INFOPATH="/opt/local/share/info:$INFOPATH"




On Mar 5, 2006, at 10:38 PM, superN00b wrote:

>
>> Anyway, all you need to do you change your $PATH environment  
>> variable to
>> make /usr/local/bin precede /usr/bin. If you don't know how to do  
>> this,
>> read the "bash" man page about the PATH environment variable. (See  
>> the
>> INVOKATION section.)
>
> OK. I looked it up, but all i found was this description:
>
> PATH   The search path for commands.  It is a colon-separated   
> list  of
>               directories  in  which the shell looks for commands (see
> COMMAND
>               EXECUTION below).  The default path is system-dependent,
> and  is
>               set  by  the administrator who installs bash.  A common
> value is
>               ``/usr/gnu/bin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/ucb:/bin:/usr/ 
> bin:.''.
>
> So I know what it is, but where does it live? Do I change it with  
> vi? Is
> it a text file or part of a text file? Sorry, I really have zero idea
> what I'm doing.
>
> -- 
> Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
>