Ahh JSR 223. 223 is, at its core, a more feature-complete and
standardized version of the Bean Scripting Framework (BSF). It
provides a standard mechanism whereby alternative JVM languages
(primarily targetted at so-called "scripting" languages) can be
plugged into and interact with Java and the rest of the JVM. BSF
provides similar capabilities; you can register a named language
interpreter, bind objects into its execution context, and send
snippits of code to that interpreter to be executed. 223 mainly
standardizes a lot of this and potentially builds that capability into
Java out-of-the-box, rather than via a third-party library.

There's shades of not-invented-here, but BSF certainly is showing its
age (it does not, for example, use more recent versions of collection
classes, nor does it take advantage of recent JVM advancements). 223
will probably be good for Java as a whole, and once it's physically
released we'll have JRuby connectors for it soon after. We also
currently provide our own java integration layers that are arguably
simpler and more "ruby-like" than what BSF or 223 provide. There's
something for all tastes, I suppose.

223 does not, however, provide a generic way to hook any arbitrary
interpreter such as C Ruby into the JVM. Using any native-language
interpreters to manipulate Java objects and the JVM itself requires
considerably more work, since plugging native code into the JVM is far
from easy. The "rjni" project does exactly that, though I can't
comment on how well it works or whether it's currently being
maintained.

On 3/3/06, Raphael Bauduin <rblists / gmail.com> wrote:
> On 3/2/06, Charles O Nutter <headius / headius.com> wrote:
> > Sorry for the unsolicited promotion of JRuby and my own blog, but I
> > have been keeping a record of updates to JRuby along with musings on
> > the future of Ruby and Java playing together at
> > http://headius.blogspot.com. For those of you like me, caught between
> > worlds, I will frequently provide updates on the progress of JRuby and
> > the future of Ruby applications running on Java. My post today updates
> > the progress of getting Rails and IRB running, with a long discussion
> > of JRuby's design goals, performance woes, and promises for the
> > future. Naturally, I'd like an audience, but I'd also like to dispel
> > the continuing rumors that JRuby is "dead".
> >
> > For those of you completely uninterested in Ruby-on-Java, you can
> > safely disregard this email.  :)
> >
> > Thank you!
>
>
> Thanks for the notice, I'll keep an eye on your blog.
> And now we talk about ruby & java, I'll take the opportunity to ask a
> question I haven't had the possibility to answer myself: what will
> JSR223 give as possibility? Is it a way for ruby (the C version) to
> access java classes? JSR223 started with a limited scope (web apps)
> that was widened later on, but up to what point?
>
> Raph
>
> >
> > --
> > Charles Oliver Nutter @ headius.blogspot.com
> > JRuby Developer @ jruby.sourceforge.net
> > Application Architect @ www.ventera.com
> >
> >
>
>


--
Charles Oliver Nutter @ headius.blogspot.com
JRuby Developer @ jruby.sourceforge.net
Application Architect @ www.ventera.com