On 2/24/06, Rob <robert.c.may / gmail.com> wrote:> Sometimes it is> easier for beginners to move forward when they don't have 10 different> options for how to do something.
While I disagree with most of what you have written (respectfully,though :), I think you hit the nail on the head here.  Most of thetime when we are showing Ruby, we are showing *off* Ruby.  How can wenot!
But, for a sufficiently beginner audience, it's not the most helpfulway to go about things.  (This was one of the things I really tried toaddress in my book.)
Having said that, I seriously doubt that looking up "how toconcatenate strings" in Ruby is much harder than in C, and '+' iseasier to remember than 'strcat', don't you think?  So you're lesslikely to have to look it up.  And which is easier to use??  What,exactly, does strcat return?  What if the strings overlap?  Plus, onceyou use strcat, you have the potential gotcha of having changed one ofyour strings.  And, of course, you have to make sure you have enoughspace in your destination string... well, not in the "string", but inthe space declared...
How can you possibly think these are equally easy??  You have to know*more* to get things done in C than in Ruby, not the other way around.
(Have you tried teaching people to program using C?  And Ruby?  If youhave, and in your experience C is not vastly more difficult for yourstudents, I'd love to hear about it.  :)
Chris