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    Hi,
    
   I am looking for the suitability of ruby for  numerical applications. I am currently using MATLAB and Octave for this  purpose (see www.octave.org, www.mathworks.com).
    
   For vectors  and matrices a single "*" or "/" operator is not sufficient to  implement the necessary matrix/vector arithmetic in a convinient and  consistent operator notation. In OOPS languages like C++ which support  operator overloading, Matrix class libraries usually resort to a mixed  functional/operator notation and assign the matrix product to the "*"  and implement the dot-product by a function e.g as dot(A, B).
    
    Besides product and division operators for matrix/vector operations it  is necessary to introduce a transpose and hermite operator which is of  no interest in scalar arithmetic. In MATLAB the transpose of a matrix X  is expressed as X.' and the conjugate transpose is X'. 
    
    A simple and compact example of how this notation can be used is in computing the   2-norm of a vector:
       x  :1:10 % Vector counting from 1 to 10
       norm2  qrt( x*x' ) % use matrix multiplication to compute the squared sum
       norm2  qrt(sum(x .* x)) % use elementwise multiplication
       norm2  qrt(sum(x .^ 2)) % square element by element
    
    In standart programming languages with an OOPS library this might look like:
      x  1 2 3 4 ... 10] ;
      norm2  qrt( x*x.transpose()) ; // use matrix multiplication
      norm2  qrt(sum(dot(x, x))) ; // use dot-product auxiliary function
    
    While for such a simple example, there is not so much difference in  readability, but for real world examples, the matrix operator notation  makes the code more compact and readable. Conceptionally it lacks  consistency, if the maybe more often used dot-product is implemented as  function and the matrix product as operator.
    
   My assumption is  that is might be possible to extend ruby with reasonable effort to add  the additional ".*" "./" and ".^2" binary operators and the transpose /  conjugate transpose operators. For the standard ruby this function  would just do the same as their scalar conterparts, however, when  implementing a matrix class these additional operators can become alive  and be used to implement the elementwise dot operations.
    
    
    Aside from the operators a second concept is quite essential for a  scripting matrix and vector class. This requires a new data-type to  express strides.
   Suppose one wants to access only every second  element of a vector or reverse a vector, then usually this has to be  done in a loop. Since looping over elements is prohibitively expensive  in a scripting language, the preferred solution for doing such common  indexing operation is to use strides. For ruby, it would be possible to  define a stride class, which stores the index of the first, last and  stepsize. Reversing a vector might look like:
    
       vector xride(1, 3) // use a stride to construct a new vector from 1 to 3.
       reverse_x  ( stride(3, 1, -1) )
    
    More elegantly, if strides are natively supported by the scripting language, then the example could be implemented as
    
      x  :3 ;
      reverse_x  (3:-1:1) ;
    
    Has anybody implemented a patch to include dot-operators or index  strides to ruby? Are there any plans / discussion to include  MATLAB/Octave-alike features in the future?
    
    Regards,
    
    よろしくおねがいします
    
    Roderick Koehle
    
    References:
     * http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matlab
     * http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IDL_programming_language
		
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