botp is right, all you need to do is listen to the news to see that
people love music, download millions of tunes a minute etc. I have
never downloaded a single song, never listen to any, other than the
operas with my mother, classic music radio... So the whole concept of
songs, of hoarding, of database is completely alien to me.

It makes complete sense that someone who loves music would write all
their examples with music.
The examples are verbose though, with a lot of text having to do with
music and not ruby. And sam's teach yourself ruby manages to show small
examples that teach the points.

I have the same problem with Agile actually. 90% of people are making a
store. I am not. The whole first part of the book is really a tutorial
which is totally irrelevant to me. It is hard for me to experiment with
what we are doing when it is so heavily embeded in the semantic of the
example. I went to a ruby presentation, and right off the bat, we
created silly pages, created several data bases of anyname we want...
Because the examples did not seem to dictate the structure as much it
was easier for me to understand what Rails does. For example we made a
page with html, then a page with html with style, then a page with xtml
for a newsreader ... and had to take out the style or it would not
work... Instead of rolling magnificiently towards "the solution" isn't
cool! we kept going back and forth between what we got, and what Rails
was doing. The example was in the background so to speak, and we were
just enjoying changing things and seeing what happened.

So I hope I can find tutorials like that on the web, which help me
remember all the default behaviors, controllers/action... web
addresses, without having to rely on the agile example which is too
heavy for all its completness.

Thank you martin for encouraging the expression of discent with popular
books, even if a post complaining about receiving unasked for boot
copies is not the place for such discussion