Tom Allison wrote:
> ara.t.howard / noaa.gov wrote:
>> On Thu, 19 Jan 2006, John Maclean wrote:
>>
>>> Chaps,
>>>
>>> Ruby seems like a great language and the book's good too. However a 
>>> novice
>>> like me won't be able to appreciate *.rb when there's soooo many 
>>> examples of
>>> "there's more than one way to do it". I learn pretty quickly and 
>>> even faster
>>> when I can understand a concept, test it and see that it works. How 
>>> do you
>>> other novices feel about this?
>>>
>>> This is not a rant/flame/plug my book/some other language is better 
>>> posting ;)
>>
>>
>> think of it as learning to drive a short throw six-speed transmission 
>> - harder
>> at first - so much faster once you've got it. ;-)
>>
>> -a
>
> Probably true.
>
> But I am finding I can't really do much writing of the code, or 
> driving of the car until I'm upwards of pages 120.  Contrast this with 
> the first Perl Book I had from O'Reilly and it's a bit frustrating.  
> Sorry about the perl analogy but it's my best and most recently used 
> language.
>
Which book was that? The only Perl book I've read is "Programming Perl," 
which is much like "Programming Ruby." It is meant to be the EVERYTHING 
book, which gives you probably way more information that you ever needed 
(the Perl book explained how strings are stored - good to know, but not 
something you need to know right away.) It's not meant to be quick dive 
into the language.
So, I don't feel the Pickaxe book is good for just learning the 
language, especially if you don't have a solid programming/comp sci 
background already. You'll probably need to do some tutorials, etc. 
However, it is really good if you want to know how to do a particular thing.

Just my thoughts...

-Justin