But there're not THAT many ways to do something even in Ruby, so you
pretty quickly pickup most of them. Moreover, for me learnig about every
new way of doing things was quite educational and I enjoyed greatly when
realizing that something that took me 20 lines of code before, now takes
5 if not 1 (in some cases). This is what I found true about Ruby:

Another (better) way => less code => less bugs => more fun

Gennady.



-----Original Message-----
From: Mark Volkmann [mailto:r.mark.volkmann / gmail.com] 
Sent: Thursday, January 19, 2006 7:44
To: ruby-talk ML
Subject: Re: My Thought on the "Pickaxe book" (from a Ruby novice)

On 1/19/06, Kenneth Collins <pine29 / myfastmail.com> wrote:
> John, pick out the way to do something that seems most natural to you 
> and get familiar with that. Then ignore the rest. I think Ruby's "more

> than one way to do it" was intended as a blessing, not a burden.

That's not really good enough though. I you ever have a need to read
Ruby code that someone else wrote, you'll have to understand every way
to do something. I love Ruby, but I'm not yet a fan of having many ways
to do something unless there are cases where each possible approach is
better than the others.

A particular thing I dislike is synonyms for methods in the built-in
classes. Sure I can choose to use the method name that makes the most
sense to me, but I still have to be aware of all the synonyms so I can
read code that others wrote.

--
R. Mark Volkmann
Partner, Object Computing, Inc.