On 1/6/06, Jim Freeze <jim / freeze.org> wrote:
>
> > On 1/6/06, James Edward Gray II <james / grayproductions.net> wrote:
> > Actually, when rolled together, both dice are zero-based. The
> > double-nought is the only special combination of 00 -> 100. When
> > rolled singly, a d10 has 0 -> 10. Rolling a 0 is never possible.
>
> No wonder I don't play D&D. I don't think I am smart enough.

Heh, I wouldn't say that. But I will admit that most of my attraction
to the game is the mental challenge of managing (and taking advantage
of) the complex rule system. Call me munchkin. Shrug.

> What does 0 -> 10 mean. Does it mean a dice can have the
> values 0,1,2,3...10?

No, that was a typo on my part. Should have been 0 -> 9 (e.g. rand(10)).

> If so, why is a 0 never possible?

Zero is possible, but is interpreted as a 10. So the effective range
is 1 -> 19 (rand(10) + 1). In this respect, the outcome of a d10
follows the same rules of the outcome from a d6, d8 or d20 (rand(N) +
1). The presentation on the dice is the only difference. As noted by
Austin, this is primarily due to space limitations, but also for
convenience when using two d10 to simulate a d100.

Jacob Fugal