> I don't think it will be possible to cross-compile with
> RubyScript2Exe.

Indeed, cross-compiling with RubyScript2Exe is not possible.
Because of the gathering of files from your own Ruby
installation, RubyScript2Exe creates an executable for the
platform it's being run on. In theory, you could trace the
application on Linux and gather the library files and gems it
uses from the Windows version of Ruby. I've investigated that
and it didn't make me happy. For me, personally, there was no
need for it either.

> Maybe it is doable to use qemu or another hardware emulator
> to test/package your script on windows without leaving your
> linux machine.

I run Linux on my laptop. On top of that, I installed Windows
98 in a virtual machine, using QEMU, and Windows 2000 in
another. Such a virtual machine is just one big file on the
native machine. When I have to boot a (not *the*) instance of
Windows 98, I simply run "win98clone abc", which copies the
original win98.img to win98-abc.img (if it doesn't already
exist...) and starts the virtual machine. In my win98-dev.img
(created with "win98clone dev") I installed Ruby+GEMS+LIBS,
FPC, RubyScript2Exe, Tar2RubyScript and other tools I need to
build an application. When it's time to test the executable, I
run "win98clone test", which results in win98-test.img, another
copy of the original win98.img. No Ruby, no tools, just Windows
98. (Both Windows 98 machines run concurrently on top of
Linux!) Hopefully, this machine is able to boot the
application.exe I created on the development machine...

There's one directory (/scratch) on my native machine that's
available as S:-drives in all Windows machines. Transferring
data from one machine to another is no problem at all.

Conclusion:

 * Develop the application on Linux.
 * Build application.exe on Windows98-dev.
 * Test application.exe on Windows98-test.

gegroet,
Erik V. - http://www.erikveen.dds.nl/