Chad Perrin wrote:
> On Mon, Dec 19, 2005 at 04:32:37AM +0900, James Britt wrote:
> 
>>(I'm quite happy using vim, Windows file manager, and a handful of 
>>custom Ruby shell scripts and Unix command ports for finding and 
>>manipulating stuff from the command line. If there's something else find 
> 
> 
> Care to share any details?

I have a few vim macros/mappings that insert text for common situations, 
such as creating the 'initialize' method, or inserting the skeletal code 
for in-file unit testing.  Plus the things that come with the ruby-vim 
menus and macro plugin (auto completion of certain Ruby control-flow 
expression, quote, bracket, and paren closing; running the current 
buffer by pressing f5; calling up ri for text under the cursor, and so on).

I have some command-line scripts to do very simple things.  Most handy 
is a grep-like thing that will find files based on some given file name 
pattern; it searches from the current directory, and emits a numbered 
list of matches. Type a number and the corresponding file opens in vim. 
  I can also run it with a second parameter to name the application that 
should open the selected matching file (handy for finding and playing mp3s).

There's some port of unix tools I've installed (not cygwin, something 
else) so I can run grep, ls, a few others.

I try to keep my files small, tend to embed unit tests in the same file 
as each class, and don't have a strong need for an uber-IDE.  Ruby makes 
it easy enough to assemble little helper tools if I get tired of 
repeating commands.

I often switch from Windows to Linux, and don't always have the option 
of running a GUI shell, so sticking to vi makes life simpler (and the 
same can be said of emacs and other Unix-based editors).

I keep multiple cmd.exe windows open (here's a tip: use the 'title' 
command to name your Windows.); each of my project has a Ruby script 
that opens up various cmd shells, each distinctly titled and  colored so 
I can more easily tell them apart.  I've Ruby tools for bouncing 
servers, launching browsers, updating remote servers, deploying 
applications, running tests.  (These should perhaps be Rake tasks, and 
some of them have been ported, but that's not a habit I've acquired.)

Overall, I'm more of a fan of lots of little tools that play together 
than The One True Tool.


James Britt

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