James Britt wrote:
> Bill Guindon wrote:
>> On 12/15/05, James Britt <james_b / neurogami.com> wrote:
>>
>>> Bill Guindon wrote:
>>> ..
>>>
>>>
>>>> I'm sure you know all of this, but just the same...
>>>>
>>>> You should point them to the success of AWDWROR [1].  It certainly is
>>>> a new/controversial idea, but it seems to be win/win.
>>>
>>> Some counterpoints for consideration:
>>>
>>> * In contrast to offering a free online version (if even only prior to
>>> publication) the pay-to-preview approach means you get fewer eyeballs
>>> and have fewer bug reports & suggestions prior to publication.
>>> Open-to-all improves quality.   
>>
>>
>> Without a doubt, it would, but I think it would be a tough sell to
>> publishers who seem to be convinced that it would reduce future sales.
>>  Pay-to-preview may mean fewer eyeballs than a free preview, but it's
>> more eyeballs than no preview (the traditional approach).
>
> I've had authors tell me they would never again offer a book for free 
> online.  Yet others swear by it.  It is not uncommon for O'Reily to 
> offer current books online for free (as part of their Open Books 
> project), and Bruce Eckel seems pleased with is results.  APress 
> offers Practical Common Lisp for free, too.  (Good book!)  And Mark 
> Watson is currently working on a Ruby book that he says will be 
> available as a free PDF.
>
> It's not that unusual; it is perhaps something of a tradition of its 
> own in geek publishing.  But, yes, if you are tying to lock down every 
> dollar, it may be too much of a risk.  It's a business, and people 
> have to find the model that gets them the results they want.
>
>
> James
>
>
I find that having a print book does several things for me: It lets me 
get my eyes away from the screen for a while; it gives me something 
productive to do in planes, trains, and automobiles (Passenger seats 
only ;-) and it is a nice distraction at times such as during TV 
commercials or while sitting on the can (Preferable to staring at the 
wall.)

Because of these many advantages I will usually buy a print book if it 
is of interest to me even if the same material is available online for 
free or reduced cost. Having the material online is an added value, 
though, because I can search it more easily when I need a quick answer 
at work. Generally, however, I will not pay for an online version, 
because I would rather have the print version (And I'm certainly not 
going to pay twice for the same content.)