Bill Guindon wrote:
> On 12/15/05, James Britt <james_b / neurogami.com> wrote:
> 
>>Bill Guindon wrote:
>>..
>>
>>
>>>I'm sure you know all of this, but just the same...
>>>
>>>You should point them to the success of AWDWROR [1].  It certainly is
>>>a new/controversial idea, but it seems to be win/win.
>>
>>Some counterpoints for consideration:
>>
>>* In contrast to offering a free online version (if even only prior to
>>publication) the pay-to-preview approach means you get fewer eyeballs
>>and have fewer bug reports & suggestions prior to publication.
>>Open-to-all improves quality.	
> 
> 
> Without a doubt, it would, but I think it would be a tough sell to
> publishers who seem to be convinced that it would reduce future sales.
>  Pay-to-preview may mean fewer eyeballs than a free preview, but it's
> more eyeballs than no preview (the traditional approach).

I've had authors tell me they would never again offer a book for free 
online.  Yet others swear by it.  It is not uncommon for O'Reily to 
offer current books online for free (as part of their Open Books 
project), and Bruce Eckel seems pleased with is results.  APress offers 
Practical Common Lisp for free, too.  (Good book!)  And Mark Watson is 
currently working on a Ruby book that he says will be available as a 
free PDF.

It's not that unusual; it is perhaps something of a tradition of its own 
in geek publishing.  But, yes, if you are tying to lock down every 
dollar, it may be too much of a risk.  It's a business, and people have 
to find the model that gets them the results they want.


James


-- 

http://www.ruby-doc.org       - Ruby Help & Documentation
http://www.artima.com/rubycs/ - Ruby Code & Style: Writers wanted
http://www.rubystuff.com      - The Ruby Store for Ruby Stuff
http://www.jamesbritt.com     - Playing with Better Toys
http://www.30secondrule.com   - Building Better Tools