On Dec 14, 2005, at 2:38 AM, Chad Perrin wrote:

> On the other hand, coding
> in a manner that is in any way less easy to maintain because you know
> that the way you write code will ensure that the problem is taken care
> of doesn't address the issue of what happens if someone else, with  
> less
> ingrained good habits, comes along and takes over.

At the risk of sounding like a broken record, I think one of the big  
advantages of Unit Tests is that they encourage you to code in a  
manner that is easier to maintain (because it's also easier to test).

As for when someone else jumps in, you show them your test suit and  
how it works and pray it's catching.  ;)  Seriously, you have to  
worry about you first.  The rest of the world takes time.  (I did ask  
in my last job interview if the company covered their software with  
Unit Tests though!  :D  )

James Edward Gray II