gwtmp01 wrote:
>>
>> extend_class( Myclass )
>> x = Myclass_extension.new
>> x.new_method1
>> y = Myclass_extension.new
>> y.new_method1
> 
> I'm not sure what you are getting at here.
> 
> Myclass.class is the particular object Class.  Because
> all class objects are instances of Class.
> 
> 	#{some_class.class}_extension
> 
> ends up being the string
> 
> 	Class_extension
> 
> because Class.to_s is the string 'Class'.
> 

Oops.  It should have been #{some_class}.  The whole point of that was 
so that I could have code that writes code (dynamically) based on states 
of other parts of the program (I think it is also known as 
metaprogramming).  Of course, with that simple example I posted, it 
wouldn't make much sense.  It seems like this sort of thing would be 
very useful for artificial intelligence (i.e., learning).

On the class singleton example you posted: that's very neat.  Now, I 
think my understanding of these sort of singletons is complete. :)

--J

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