Matthew Smillie wrote:
> 
> If you're not enrolling full-time at a university for the entire degree 
> course, then the most usual way to study there is on some sort of 
> exchange program.  Most universities would be unlikely to knowingly take 
> you on for only 1-2 years, and even if they did, trying to transfer your 
> work and credit back to Denmark could be problematic.

Thank you very much for your detailed reply!
I was hoping to study for a full 4 year period, though I know it's not 
going to be easy, so I'm also prepared to try other ways. There are a 
lot of exchange programs, but it seems like most are directed towards 
the economic fields (we have to specialize when we finish high school.) 
I know that there is a good chance I'll be able to study abroad for one 
or two semesters, but it just feels like such a short period of time.

> You would normally study abroad in your second or third year of 
> university.  It would be relatively unusual to study abroad for your 
> first year, and probably wouldn't do you all that much good 
> academically, anyway.  Especially if you're going to a school like 
> Berkley, you'll get a lot more out of it academically in your third year 
> than in your first.  

I think it may be too late for me to study abroad in my first year, 
anyway, so it's kind of a relief that it's not there the action is.

> The first thing I would do would be to see if your university in Denmark 
> has any exchange programs operating with universities abroad.  Since 
> you've done well enough to pick the university you want in Denmark, look 
> into what exchange programs they have when you're choosing.  If where 
> you end up doesn't have an exchange program (or if they're to 
> universities you're not interested in), you can usually still arrange 
> your own exchange with a little bit of leg-work and communication.  
> Application dates will vary, but they can be as early as November or 
> December, so if you want to go on exchange in your second year, you're 
> in for a very busy first term at university.

I think that's the sanest approach, too. Unfortunately, I'm don't think 
it's possible to be on an exchange program for more than a year or so. 
But of course, if I could arrange my own exchange while enrolled in a 
danish university... That actually sound very interesting

> The next thing to worry about is funding.  Someone will pay an arm and a 
> leg for you to study abroad, so you'll have to make sure it's not you.  
> Once again, your own university in Denmark will have the best 
> information for you regarding sources of funding from Denmark (but don't 
> expect them to have *all* the information).  If you want to go to a 
> particular school in the US, contact their international students' 
> office (they will all have something that fits that description).  It 
> may even be worth contacting the relevant departments for information.

I think there's a better chance of getting scholarships from the US than 
from Denmark. I've only heard of one organisation here, and there are 
all kind of weird restrictions in their scholarships (like that I can't 
return to study or work in the US or even apply for a green card before 
several years after the exchange period is over.)

> I'm not familiar with Denmark in particular, but if the system works 
> anything like Sweden and Norway, you might consider waiting until you're 
> almost finished in Denmark and going to the US to study for part of a 
> Master's degree (the 'typical' degree you finish with in Sweden and 
> Norway is more similar to an American Master's than Bachelor's degree).  
> The minus of this is that it's further in the future, but the plus side 
> is that it will be easier to find funding, you'll be more likely to find 
> a place you like to study, and you'll be more likely to be studying 
> something really interesting (rather than just taking first-year 
> programming classes).  And by then you'll be of legal drinking age in 
> the US as well.

I'm realizing from your post that going abroad for my first year isn't 
that good an idea. I now think I'll wait 'till my second, though that 
makes it harder for me to choose an education here. Yes, it's the legal 
drinking ago that did it. Ours is 16 :)

> Finally, I'll let my own nationalism slip through, and suggest that you 
> think about Canada as well as the US.  The University of Toronto is a 
> good school for CS and math, and is a great city.  Simon Frasier 
> University near Vancouver is smaller, but has a good reputation as well, 
> and both Vancouver and Toronto are fantastic cities to live in.  
> Canadian universities also generally cheaper than the US, even when 
> paying international tuition rates.

That may also be an option. How's the weather in those cities? The 
Danish weather is driving me crazy (cold and rainy).


Thank you so much for your reply, it really helped me a lot!
Daniel