I do too, actually, in certain circumstances. The nice thing I likeabout Ports/Portage is it *almost is* compiling from scratch, justedit the Makefile/ebuild to change how it builds. The reason I prefernot to roll-my-own is... I forget to upgrade. Yeah, it's bad of me,but I just can't help but like to "emerge -uD --newuse world" or"portupgrade -a" every couple days and be up-to-date a couple minuteslater I've always hated binary packages (rpms especially).Debian/Ubuntu's system isn't bad for a simple, no-muss-no-fussdevelopment box, I've found recently.
And just to through another contender into the mix:I just installed OpenBSD for my firewall box, and I've fallen in love.Everything's chrooted *by default*, and you are encouraged to compileyour software from source. The Ports collection has many rather largeomissions, but it functions very well for providing infrastructure(libraries and stuff you don't really care about) on which you compileyour "business software" (e.g. Ruby, lighttpd). Secondly: It doesn'tuse rc-scripts. I hate those. Sure, they're nice when restartinglighttpd for example, but some Linux systems have an init system sobloated and confusing I start to cry. And you can just implementwhatever init script system you want, and call the scripts in the*two* (nice small number, eh?) master startup/shutdown scripts. Also,it boots ferociously quickly compared to my Linux boxes. Seeing it goup so quickly makes me smile :-)It's secure, and drop-dead simple (can you tell I like simple? Noteasy, just simple.). OpenBSD just clicks with me, I recommend thatthose who haven't tried it do so on a spare box!
Jacob
On 11/20/05, Jeff Wood <jeff.darklight / gmail.com> wrote:> Also, remember that there are still a large number of us *ix users> that prefer to roll our own, and regardless of the packaging system> provided by the OS, I'm gonna go get & compile for myself... I prefer> things that way... Then I know what I have and where I've put it.>> I've never had a lick of trouble with a system I setup this way... my> mileage with OS provided packages, unfortunately don't hold that same> quality.>> ...>> j.>> On 11/20/05, Aaron Kulbe <akulbe / gmail.com> wrote:> > > Lots of people happen to like FreeBSD for its Ruby support. One of its> > > major system utilities, portupgrade, is written in Ruby, so that's one> > > neat aspect. I'd recommend staying away from Gentoo: I prefer> > > source-based OSs, but Gentoo just breaks too often for it to be worth> > > it. Also, Gentoo users are on the whole jerkyer and less helpful than> > > normal people.> >> > (I'd like to start out by apologizing first, gentlemen.  this is> > certainly off-topic, but needs to be said)> >> > Well Jacob, you succeed in communicating four things in your reply here.> >> > 1. you say Gentoo is prone to be broken> > 2. you say Gentoo users are jerks> > 3. you say Gentoo users are less helpful> > 4. you say Gentoo users are not normal> >> > As a Gentoo user, and a Gentoo developer... I'd like to say that I'm> > rather disturbed, maybe even slightly offended, at your remarks.  We> > work hard to make the distribution good.  And I'd like to say that the> > users bear some responsibility in how well their systems run.> >> > If you want to build your system with an insane set of CFLAGS and USE> > flags, then I think problems that result are your own fault.> >> > You say Gentoo users are jerkyer [sic] than other users.  I beg to> > differ.  A jerk is a jerk, and it matters not what distro the said> > jerk wants to use.  People with the kind of attitude I'm sure you're> > referring to are unbecoming to the entire Linux community.  Gentoo> > does not have the corner on this market, and it's unfair to say so.> >> > Gentoo users are less helpful?  I'm sorry, but this is utter crap.  It> > was this one thing that attracted me to the distribution in the first> > place, before any of its technical merits.  I can personally vouch for> > this.  I had a very frustrating experience early on, when I started to> > use Gentoo.  I kept hitting a wall and was ready to give up.  I had> > one of the developers help me, personally, to figure out the issues I> > was having.  This took a period of hours, and I was ready to pay him> > for his time.  He flatly refused, and asked only one thing in return -> > that I never again say I was going to give up on Gentoo.  I didn't.> > Question - do you think we're less helpful because you come into> > #gentoo and ask a question, and don't get an answer *immediately*?  If> > that's the case, keep in mind it's a VERY busy channel.  And try> > idling there, and remember... /lastlog is your friend.> >> >> > By saying Gentoo users are jerkyer [sic] than normal people, you make> > us out to be abnormal.  Care to explain that one?  We're no different> > than anyone else.  I just enjoy a little more control over my chosen> > distribution.  Does that make one abnormal?  I think not.> >> > Now... on to the Ruby business.  Keep in mind, there is admittedly a> > bit of bias here, but I'm laying out all the cards.  I think Gentoo is> > an excellent distribution to host from, and do Ruby work from.  It> > might require more dedication on your part.  Gentoo is hands-on.  But> > it's really good for people who like to tinker.  Good luck.> >>>> --> "Remember. Understand. Believe. Yield! -> http://ruby-lang.org">> Jeff Wood>>