Selon Robert Klemme <bob.news / gmx.net>:

>
> Just out of curiosity: which languages are you referring to and what do
> they do?
>

The only languages I've ever used that I know have a switch/case statement are
Pascal, C and LINC (a database-related language from Unisys). AFAIK, in all
those cases the case statements are equivalent to using an if/elsif/else
construction, with the expression introduced by the switch/case being at the
*left* of the equal sign, and the different possibilities at the right. It is
especially true of LINC, where the case statement can only introduce a
variable, while the different choices can be literals (and literals in LINC
can't be at the left of a condition expression).

> >
> > Wow! Some of the things one can do with Ruby make my head spin! The
> > worst is: I can understand what it means!!! ;)
>
> Pity you... :-))
>

When I see this kind of programs, I always think: there's just no way I should
be able to understand this! I am whether completely wrong in my understanding,
or getting insane! (you have to realise I've never had true IT or CS education
in my entire life)

>
> Ok, print this out in a bold 64pt font "I must never forget that in a CASE
> statement conditions have their === invoked." :-)
>

It will get lost in the moving (I'm moving within a month). But I'll keep this
post, for security :) .

Thanks!
--
Christophe Grandsire.

http://rainbow.conlang.free.fr

It takes a straight mind to create a twisted conlang.