>> class AnonUser        ; end
>> class RegularUser <  AnonUser    ; end
>> class Developer   <  RegularUser ; end
>> class Guru        <  Developer   ; end
>> class Sysop       <  Guru        ; end



[...]

> One thing that may be bad about this approach is that you can't have
> multiple inheritance. You should at least use modules extending a User
> class, so that you allow for a more interesting hirarchie. And I don't
> see why User should not have a set of properties and methods like
>
>     * developer?
>     * sysop?
>
> etc. (Created dynamically, naturally :-)
>
> That are my thoughts about the approach.



Thanks for your thoughts. The above (my approach) fits so nicely with
the single table inheritance in Rails without implementing a single
line of code (except for the five lines above). With this, I get never
above the multiple of 500 (or was it 5000?) lines of code to get a
higher patrick.to_i value. But the #developer? (and alike) methods read
better, right.

Patrick