Hi Dave,

I picked up the Pragmatic Programmer some years ago simply because it
had a wood plane on the cover( I knew how to use a tablesaw and a
router well before a debugger). I now manage a team of 6 rookie
programmers who I have run through a course that I based on the
Pragmatic Programmer.

I've been using Ruby more and more for daily tasks (replacing Perl) and
have been, in general, working to get it more accepted and used where I
work.

While most on my team may now claim having 6-9 months of "real"
experience, they are still pretty young, so we might be a good
candidate group for you. If you're going for the level of the
Deitel&Deitel books ( C How to Program, etc ), while excellent
books!!!, that is definately more elementary than where we're at. If
that's the case you could kick us a Rails book though. I would bet that
one in our office would get 10 more bought in a hand full of months.

I'd also be more than happy to subject my team to any type of
ruby/rails experiment that we could dream up. Maybe something like
subject 6 rookie programmers to a new language and then get their take
on how they felt about it.

We're the content engineering team at simplyhired.com.

cheers,
Daniel




Dave Thomas wrote:
> Hi, all.
>
> Chris Pine is just finishing off the first draft of his "Learn to
> Program with Ruby" book (based on his incredibly successful web
> series), and I'm looking for reviewers.
>
> However, before you all rush to sign up, there's a catch. I'm really
> looking for folks who are the book's target audience: folks with
> little or no programming experience who want to learn how to code.
> They'll probably be from mid teens on up, curious, and happy to give
> honest feedback as they go through the book.
>
> So, if you know someone like that, and if they'd be interested in
> participating, have them drop me a line (dave / pragprog.com).
> 
> Thanks a lot
> 
> 
> Dave