Lothar Scholz <llothar / mailandnews.de> wrote:
>On Wed, 30 May 2001 00:44:48 GMT, ptkwt / shell1.aracnet.com (Phil
>Tomson) wrote:
>
>>In article <3B4B4F3B / operamail.com>,
>>Benjamin J. Tilly <ben_tilly / operamail.com> wrote:
>>>Lothar Scholz <llothar / mailandnews.de> wrote:
>>>On Wed, 30 May 2001 07:44:58 +0900, Glen Starchman
>>><glen / enabledventures.com> wrote:
>>>[...]
>>>
>>>Off of the top of my head, the following small companies are
>>>based on open source and as far as I know are doing just fine:
>>>Loki, Crynwr, Sleepycat, Stonehenge, Ars Digita, Scyld,
>>>Aladdin...
>
>Loki ???
>Perhaps they have some very small minor product spin offs like the
>installer - but mainly they are very very closed source.

Yes, Loki.  The games you are thinking of are not theirs.
They are ports done per contract.  However the porting
libraries, graphics work, etc that *do* belong to Loki
are open source.  Go to http://www.lokigames.com/development/
and choose which one to download.

>>And in this particular product space there is ActiveState which has been
>>making noises about supporting Ruby ...  They seem to be doing well.

I deliberately avoided most of the obvious open source
companies.

>You got the Source code for Kommodo ??
>I only got an offer to buy it for 400$

If you look closely at the companies that I listed you
will find most walk interesting lines between open source
and proprietary software.  I did not just list many
companies, I also listed companies with different
strategies.  Every one has a strategy that revolves in
some way around open source.  But they are all different.

Note that most of them predate Open Source as a buzzword.

>I was talking about the companies which tried to live on open source
>support without having a proprietary product. I don't believe that
>there is a chance to change this. All you get is turning your
>"company" into a consulting agency - but than developing time must
>be very reduced.

This varies from company to company.  I am unconvinced
that proprietary software realistically devotes a greater
portion of their energy to development than open source
software can.

But yes, consulting models do seem popular.

Cheers,
Ben