* Phil Tomson <ptkwt / aracnet.com> [2005-09-30 21:52]:
> In article <20050930235907.GA5084 / maribor.izzy.net>,
> Alan Gutierrez  <alan-ruby-talk / engrm.com> wrote:
> >    I'd like to build a CSS renderer in modern C++ as an enthusist's
> >    pursuit. I don't want to get bogged down in huge build systems,
> >    or many different IDEs. 
> >
> >    I'd like to make development rapid by using a scripting
> >    language where I can. I want it to be Ruby. I'm adopting Ruby as
> >    a build system for C++ as noted in another thread.
> >    
> >    It would be nice to script complicated algrothims in Ruby,
> >    before fixing them in C++. I'd like to work on making objects
> >    accessible to Ruby as I go along.
> >
> >    I know that Ruby can communicate with C++ using SWIG, but I'm
> >    wondering if there isn't anything more explicit. Something that
> >    will bind tighter to Ruby. The Boost libraries favor Python due
> >    to Boost::Python. Is there something similar, or is there
> >    interest in something similar?
> >
> >        http://www.boost.org/libs/python/doc/

> I would definitely be interested in something like this, although, how 
> different would it be from Inline::C/C++?

    I'll have to look into Inline::C/C++ and get back to you. But,
    if it is like an inline assembler, like the Perl module of the
    same name, I want to keep C++ independent.
    
    I don't see the C++ as being an inline speedup of a Ruby method,
    but a bridge between two systems, and one that permits the
    programmer to wander back and forth across that bridge, using
    Ruby or modern C++ when it suits them.

    I want to program in modern C++. The Advanced C++ series looks
    like fun, so I'm going to approach this project with those
    concepts. I'm not looking to use C++ sparingly, rather I want to
    use the full kit as intended.

    Use Case
    
    For a CSS renderer, I don't want to deal directly with expat or
    worse, write my own C++ xml parser. I'd rather use Ruby to parse
    an XML file, and have it feed events to a modern C++ builder
    that would create the DOM, which would be implemented in modern C++.

    On a desktop, Ruby can be the XML parser, on a cell phone, maybe
    a binary DOM format is stored to a database.
    
    Then, I'd like to prototype a BIDI algorithm in as little time
    as possible. I'd like to use Ruby for that algorithm, so the DOM
    is going to have to send events to Ruby when the user edits a form.

    This might have been too much of an answer. :^\

--
Alan Gutierrez - alan / engrm.com - http://engrm.com/blogometer/