On 9/20/05, Robbie Carlton <robbie.carlton / gmail.com> wrote:
> thanks for the road-map. I've just got stuck in. README.EXT is very handy,
> and I hadn't even thought of grep (I'm on a mac, and the unix underbelly is
> still not second nature yet).
> also, kudos for the funny book why.
> 
> On 9/20/05, why the lucky stiff <ruby-talk / whytheluckystiff.net> wrote:
> >
> > Robbie Carlton wrote:
> >
> > >Hi.
> > >I'd like to read the ruby source (that is, the source that when compiled,
> > >yields the ruby interpreter). I have them, and I've had a look, but I
> > just
> > >get overwhelmed. I've never read a big c program before, and I was
> > wondering
> > >if anyone had any advice on where to start, or if there has been any
> > >documentation?
> > >
> > Try README.EXT which comes with Ruby. It'll give ya a quick gloss over
> > everything.
> >
> > From there, I'd look over ruby.h and intern.h, which will give you a
> > tour of the major structs and functions.
> >
> > When you start diving into the various source files, note the Init_
> > functions at the end of each of them. (string.c has an Init_String,
> > marshal.c has Init_marshal, etc.) These functions create the actual
> > Ruby modules, classes and methods from their C counterparts.
> >
> > _why
> >
> >
> 
> 

Also it might help to read about creating C extensions for ruby. The
pick-axe book has a chapter.

-- 
Nicholas Van Weerdenburg