A programmer should live in a dark room in a city with a cool climate to
avoid feeling any obligation to go outside.
There should be a fridge close to hand and a cafe over the road.
There should be a fast Internet connection and a reliable power supply.
The city itself is irrelevant.

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Devin Mullins" <twifkak / comcast.net>
To: "ruby-talk ML" <ruby-talk / ruby-lang.org>
Sent: Wednesday, September 21, 2005 8:09 AM
Subject: [OT] Places for a programmer to live?


While we seem to be rife with OT threads, I thought I'd throw in an OT
question that's been percolating in my mind for quite a while.

Where do you recommend to live? Feel free to provide just a city name,
or to go into detail. When I say "for a programmer," I'm mainly
referring to the existence of programming jobs, but other aspects, such
as the existence of ?UGs, proximity to nerdy attractions, etc. could
play a part. Also feel free to just tell me some places to look for
ideas, and then tell me to Get to Googlin'. :)

Obviously, the usual places show up: Silicon Valley, Wash DC (where I am
now), *insert big city here* -- any info you have about why you would or
wouldn't recommend one of these would be appreciated. I'm also looking
for places that are off-the-beaten path (but still accessible, so
Fraser, B.C. is out of the question, sorry) -- Portland, OR and even
Bend, OR seem to be attracting techies, for example. Why? Should I be
interested, too? Why or why not? I have preference towards places in the
US, but if you have hometown pride, you are of course welcome to give it
shoutout. :)

For the short term, I'm stuck here earning a living, and for the medium
term, I'm probably going to go where my long-time friends are, in Calif.
(SF? SB? LA? SD? not sure), but I'm trying to plan ahead a little more
than I have in the past, so am hoping to build an arsenal of info. You
guys are the best group I could think to ask.

I'll provide a little about DC, in fairness to y'all, and maybe as a
template.
1. The housing market here is ridiculously expensive. I think it might
be going down a *little* soon, but yikes, it's high.
2. It's probably because high tech jobs are in high supply here. Gov't
contracting is the name of the game, and while you probably won't be
using Agile methodologies to build the Next Big Thing, you'll at least
have a fairly well-paying and steady job.
3. Weather's not fantastic. Temperate climates. Warm for its latitude
because of some sort of wind thing. Generally pretty cloudy during the
Spring/Fall, though, due to its proximity to the water.
4. Traffic sucks. Combine that with the fact that you can only afford to
live in the boonies and you've got a recipe for un-fun.
5. Entertainment is pretty decent, if you don't mind the traffic it
takes to get there. We've got the Kennedy Center in DC, Nissan Pavillion
out west in Warrenton, VA, all sorts of jazz, bars, etc. and DC is
obviously a pretty popular place for artists to include as part of a
national/regional tour. We've got fantastic museums and art galleries,
many of which are free.
6. There's a very good variety of decent restaurants, and some very good
ones. Of course, for any genre X of food, there's apparently some city Y
that produces better X. Oh well. :)
7. It's a big, suburban region. You're not going to see any "sense of
belonging" to the DC area, in people. You're not going to find that
'cept for probably way in the city (where it's urban), or way out (where
it's rural, in which case you'll find the annual Nokesville festival, or
whatever).
8. I may be full of it.

I shut up now.

Thanks,
Devin