There's plenty of places you can find recommendations for languages.

- this mailing list (the archives will have references to all the ones 
you meantion, plus other ones such as Io, and D, and boo, and Groovy - 
of which Io is the only one you might call "far out" - and, oh yeah, 
Smalltalk)
- practically any programming mailing list :)
- http://lambda-the-ultimate.org/ (where language geeks go to be snobby 
and up-tight)
- http://www.google.com/search?q=esoteric+programming+languages (okay, 
those probably weren't what you were looking for)
- http://cliki.tunes.org/Programming%20Languages -- This page nicely 
categorizes them by "paradigms."

Here's two languages you're not likely to find immediately. Presented 
for no apparent reason.

1. http://www.erights.org/e/satan/ -- I haven't actually read this 
paper, but it seems topical, so maybe somebody else will, and provide us 
a book report. :)
2. http://www.madore.org/~david/programs/unlambda/ -- The purest, 
simplest programming language ever, and it's functional, to boot. Smart 
combination of a few simple constructs allows for a whole world of 
flexibility.

Have fun.

Devin
APL, Eiffel, Erlang, Haskell, Io, Joy, Lisp, Lua, Mathematica, 
Mozart/Oz, OCaml, Prolog, REXX, Scala, Scheme, Self, and Smalltalk are 
all the legitimate, 'alternative' languages that I recognize (by name 
only, for the most part) from that wiki page, so maybe that makes them 
more popular. Now get to Googlin'.

Greg Lorriman wrote:

>Dear sirs and madames,
>
>I've thrown myself into ruby and I'm having a pleasant time.
>
>Now I am looking to find another language to learn with three features, two 
>of which Ruby has, and I am looking for your words of advice and guidance.
>
>The features I am looking for are
>
>1)enjoyableness
>2)practicalness
>3)alternativeness
>
>with a decent nod to
>
>4)not so long a learning curve (hey, I'm from the TV generation; I need 
>instant kicks).
>
>Ruby does the first two, but now I want to cruise into other dimensions, and 
>ruby isn't really weird and alternative enough.
>
>I really would like something that makes me think in a very different 
>manner, and is excellent at solving a range of problems that imperative 
>languages are not too good at. I would like to be using it a lot for 
>real-world stuff, like I am Ruby and Delphi.
>
>Now because you guys are tuned to enjoyableness, and probably have a measure 
>of appreciation of the need for practicality I am hoping that you might give 
>me some commentary on what you think might be worth looking at.
>
>I've vaguely looked at Ocaml, Heskel, Scheme, Mercury. (Lisp would seem to 
>wander too far away from simplicity which I reckon probably impacts 
>enjoyableness, but then someone has said that OCaml isn't so simple but is 
>very enjoyable; so you can see why I haven't listed simplicity as a 
>requirement.). I doubt I can go too far off the mainstream since requirement 
>2 would be impacted. So if anyone wishes to comment on the usual 
>'alternative' languages, as well as exotic stuff from other galaxies, then I 
>am very interested.
>
>Of course I have no experience in any of these. I also see little in the way 
>of languages being compared for enjoyableness. I don't care for performance 
>tables since performance only solves one problem which Intel and AMD can 
>solve for me, and I'm more interested in the infinite number of other 
>problems.
>
>Grateful for any of your wonderful and marvellous thoughts,
>
>Greg 
>
>
>
>
>  
>