Hello ToRA,


T> For example, in Java/C# etc. you have to declare the type of any and
T> every variable you create.  In languages like ML / Haskell, the
T> compiler is able to infer the types of your variables (you may
T> optionally expicitly declare the type of them yourself if you want).

You forget that this does absolutely not fit into the ruby model. You
can't do type inference with overloaded operators. I don't know
Haskell but i know a little bit of OCAML and there you have to use the
ugly floating point operators "+." etc.

Otherwise there is nothing the compiler can find out.

Ruby is highly overloaded, so type interference is almost impossible.
Take this together with all the other methods (i don't talk about eval
here) and you see that this is a different world.



-- 
 Best regards,                        emailto: scholz at scriptolutions dot com
 Lothar Scholz                        http://www.ruby-ide.com
 CTO Scriptolutions                   Ruby, PHP, Python IDE 's