So, 

To answer "how/why would you test this"... you should have tests in
place for your logging functionality.  The second something doesn't
come out right, you know that something is marring the system. 
Debugging starts by walking the source of the packages you are using
and watching for references to the modified functionality... It's not
that hard to track down.

Anyways, that's what I do ... it works for me. As far as posting
example code ... sorry, some companies don't let ya do that.

j.

On 8/24/05, Bill Kelly <billk / cts.com> wrote:
> From: "Jeff Wood" <jeff.darklight / gmail.com>
> >
> > You shouldn't be afraid of having power.  That's why you have tests.
> > You do have tests, right? ... right??? ... RIGHT !!?!?!?!??!
> 
> Dudes, I do have tests.  How in blazes would you write a test
> to catch the problem I described?  (Please show your work.  :)
> And why would you ever think to do so?
> 
> It's not being afraid of having power.  In my own applications,
> I'll exploit any and every cool capability of Ruby I feel like.
> 
> But when I personally write a module I view as a library I'd
> like others to find useful, I take a decidedly more conservative
> approach - deliberately.
> 
> Do you not consider libraries and applications different, where
> Ruby's beloved Openness is concerned?
> 
> 
> Regards,
> 
> Bill
> 
> 
> 
> 


-- 
"So long, and thanks for all the fish"

Jeff Wood