I'm in no ways any sort of authority on this subject or have any
experience hiring Coders/Developers/Programmers/Whatever, but why is
it specifically important that they have Ruby knowledge or experience
before hiring them to the job?

Any codemonkey worth his salt can pick up a new language in about a
month and be pretty productive in it by the end of the next month.  I
understand that the margins are pretty narrow on new companies, but
it'd seem to me that a better hiring strategy in the long term would
be to hire really great guys and then ask them to adapt to your
technology.

On 8/16/05, Phil Tomson <ptkwt / aracnet.com> wrote:
> In article <200508160946.51724.khaines / enigo.com>,
> Kirk Haines  <khaines / enigo.com> wrote:
> >On Tuesday 16 August 2005 8:45 am, Jared Nuzzolillo wrote:
> >
> >
> >> I would LOVE to use Ruby for this new venture; the agility and efficiency
> >> it will provide will be vital to our success. But, my biggest fear is that,
> >> when I need to hire help (probably two more programmers in the next six to
> >> eight months), I will be unable to find experienced Ruby practitioners. I
> >> am familiar with the "Python Paradox" and I agree with the concepts behind
> >> it, I am just wildly ignorant of the market conditions down here in South
> >> Florida.
> >
> >> Most likely, I would have to have on-site programmers (I don't know that I
> >> would have success in convincing my partners otherwise). When I start
> >> searching for help in six to eight months, will I be able to find two or
> >> more programmers in a timely manner (say, a month or so from when I begin
> >> searching)? Have you had trouble finding Ruby programmers? Have you had any
> >> luck enticing ruby hackers to relocate to your area?
> >
> >It may be a difficult sell, but having worked for many, many years in various
> >sorts of telecommuting positions, it can work well with the right people.  I
> >do contract work now, and while travel is an option, I've found that I can do
> >almost everything that I need to do via telephone and internet.  So while it
> >may be a tough sell to your partners, I wouldn't rule it out completely.  It
> >can work well.
> >
> >As for entincing ruby hackers to relocate, I think that most people's
> >experience in that area is still too new.  Except for small, occasional
> >examples, Ruby does not have a lot of history as a mainstream language in
> >primary use by companies, especially those offering relocation as part of
> >their compensation package.
> >
> >Given a good enough job, though, Ruby programmers are just like anyone else;
> >some of them will certainly relocate for a good job.
> 
> 
> Since this is South Florida we're talking about, I suspect that if you
> advertise in the December to February timeframe you'll find lots of eager
> takers.  However, advertising right now (near the height of hurricane
> season) may not be as fruitful.  Every new hurricane that forms out there
> will offer too much negative publicity for your area.
> 
> Yes, South Florida sounds enticing - IF I could live there from November
> through May and spend the rest of the year somewhere else ;-)
> 
> 
> 
> Phil
> 
> 


-- 
-Dan Nugent