Thought I'd poke my head up at this point.  I signed on this list a
half-hour or so ago, intending to do a bit of Seep-publicizing, just in
time to see Jim Weirich take care of it for me!  Crazy!  Thanks!

I'm the author of Seep, which Jim has characterized perfectly...Spring
like, lots of XML.  If you hate XML, you'll hate Seep :)

The beauty of Seep (and this is entirely stolen from Spring) is that it
is versatile enough to give you 1) all that DI stuff, and 2) a unifying
syntax for configuration.  I can (and do) configure pretty much
everything in my applications, from ActiveRecord mappers to Log4r, using
Seep.

I'm a Ruby beginner, so I hope some of you hard-core Ruby folk take a
look at Seep.  I could use some feedback on what would help it be more
useful.

Regards,

    Gary

On Wed, 2005-07-27 at 02:36 +0900, Jim Weirich wrote:
> On Tuesday 26 July 2005 11:37 am, Jim Freeze wrote:
> > > There is a joke going around the Ruby community that there are more
> > > DI/IoC frameworks in Ruby than there are people actually using the
> > > frameworks.
> >
> > Yes, and aren't there only two DI/IoC frameworks that exist? ;)
> 
> Here's the ones I know about:
> 
> * Copland -- Hivemind based from Jamis Buck
> 
> * DI -- The version I wrote about in response to Jamis's Copland talk. (see 
> http://onestepback.org/index.cgi/Tech/Ruby/DependencyInjectionInRuby.rdoc)
> 
> * Needle -- Again from Jamis, based DI.
> 
> * MinDI -- Minimal framework from Joel VanderWerf 
> (http://redshift.sourceforge.net/mindi)
> 
> * seep -- Inspired by Spring (i.e. lots of XML), by Gary Shea 
> (http://seep.rubyforge.org/index.html)
> 
> * DIM -- Dependency Injection, Minimal, 30 lines of Ruby Code, developed for 
> my OSCON talk (currently unreleased ... I'll post it after OSCON).
>