-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----

In article <slrnddbh68.195.me / serpentor.cobrala>,
Preston Crawford  <me / REMOVESPAMBLOCKprestoncrawford.com> wrote:
>I'm an outsider to the Ruby community. I've used it a time or two, 
>mostly to get familiar with it. I've read part of the PickAxe, but my 
>job (Java) keeps me in Java-land. I'm wondering what those of you using 
>Ruby feel are Ruby's chances of taking off. At least to the extent that 
>you could begin to see it used in places where J2EE is being used 
>currently. I know this is already happening. But my question is more 
>with regards to the future. Is something like RoR worth learning in the 
>context of being able to actually put it to use in the future? I know 
>I'm asking for conjecture. And that's all I expect. But not being 
>actively involved in the community, I get no sense as to how much 
>momentum Ruby has, and thus what the chances of it becoming more 
>commonly used, are.
>
>I know Java has a head start and has the backing of many large 
>corporations, so it's perhaps not an apt comparison to make. But I like 
>the language. And I like the philosophy of Ruby. To what extent this is 
>translating into projects and jobs, however, I have no idea.
>

_ I've gotten unsolicited inquiries from recruiters looking for
Ruby on Rails experience. Since my Ruby expertise is actually
pretty limited, I suspect there must be some demand for
experienced people. I would think that if you want a Ruby 
job ROR is a must. I see it as being the equivalent for Ruby of 
what cgi scripting was for perl in the late 90's. 

_ Booker C. Bense 



-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: 2.6.2

iQCVAwUBQtZ/dWTWTAjn5N/lAQFyuwP+JEL03hCMePBsADAmOM2CHL8uwMaSLOXW
2O8EJSe2vvqhcogyPyxAaPvOSEeZyrG53j4XtcFee1MupJKGdYfSoLL1k0R5YhqZ
k1R7MvxYMT+kjvzTCOlHicrL0zOHg14cx1DUU6Y0s5kvhyHLgRfvBBa++SHFHGAW
h3zB2c/Go5Y=
=C6Ux
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----