Hi,
1. I have a fair idea about the Tcl binidng to Tk and also a bit of pearl.

2. I have used FOX 12 for the 1st version,however the output wasnt
very satisfactory.

3.For the application,speed will be a concern.

4.I just checked wxRuby.........seems to be much better than FOX.

Thanks n Regards
Dibya prakash

On 7/11/05, David Brady <ruby_talk / shinybit.com> wrote:
> Dibya Prakash wrote:
> 
> >Hi,
> >I am working on a financial trading software.I need to create some
> >complex UI's.Can anyone help me with some good UI tools?Any other
> >suggestion is also welcome.
> >
> >
> I dabbled with Ruby about a year ago, and got defeated by this very
> problem.  I picked Ruby up again a month ago, and I started back down
> the Ruby GUI rathole this week.  Here's my trail of breadcrumbs.  Hope
> it helps!  :-)
> 
> Ruby/Tk
> - Tk is a mature, script-driven set of UI components that has bindings
> for most popular scripting languages.  It runs on Windows, Mac and
> Linux.  Tk defines its own set of UI widgets, so the controls look
> exactly the same on all three platforms.  But let's be honest: Tk looks
> like crap.  Next to a well-polished UI, Tk looks pretty klunky.  Because
> it's script-driven, Tk slows down with very complex UIs.  Ruby/Tk's
> biggest feature is probably that it comes with the standard Ruby
> install: people who use your application will only need Ruby, and won't
> have to install another GUI toolkit.  Tk is easy to learn and is ideally
> suited to simple applications where the important thing is to give
> someone an app with a functional UI without requiring them to install
> the toolkit.
> 
> - Moderately well documented.  If you know the tcl, perl, or python
> bindings to Tk you'll have no problem with Ruby/Tk.  If you DON'T know
> those bindings, you'll have a tougher time: the Ruby/Tk approach seems
> to be "learn the differences between perl/Tk and Ruby/Tk and then get
> the perl/Tk manual."
> 
> - There's an excellent tutorial at
> http://members.chello.nl/~k.vangelder/ruby/learntk/
> 
> - A good reference at http://www.tcl.tk/man/tcl8.4/TkCmd/contents.htm.
> 
> 
> Ruby/Gtk, Gtk+, Gtk2
> - Gtk is a linux-native Gui toolkit that produces beautiful UIs for
> Linux.  I believe Windows and Mac ports exist, but I am not sure.  The
> tutorial for Gtk is pretty minimal, but it gives you the feel of the
> toolkit and the reference manual is very thorough.  The C-style bindings
> of Gtk2 feel better to my brain than the Tcl-style bindings of Tk, and I
> have had no trouble working with Gtk.
> 
> - A barebones tutorial is at
> http://ruby-gnome2.sourceforge.jp/hiki.cgi?tut-gtk
> 
> - A superb reference is at http://ruby-gnome2.sourceforge.jp/hiki.cgi?Gtk
> 
> 
> wxRuby
> Ruby has bindings to the wxWindows (now wxWidgets) libraries through
> wxRuby.  I haven't looked into wxWidgets in about a year.  At the time
> wxRuby was a hopeless endeavor: it had the same feel as Tk, "Learn the
> difference between wxRuby and the C bindings to wxWidgets, and then use
> the wxWidgets C reference", except the C reference didn't exist: you
> needed to sift through the header files, and then sift through the
> wxRuby source to find the discrepancies.  wxRuby was infuriating: it was
> beautiful, it was fast, it used native widgets for Linux, Windows and
> Mac.... but the only way to learn wxRuby was to already know wxRuby.
> 
> Now, the reason I use words like "infuriating" is because of all the
> cross-platform GUI toolkits, wxWidgets really does look like it's got
> the most potential, and it's the one I would most like to be able to
> use.  If it was ugly or slow, I wouldn't care.  :-)  For all that I've
> blasted it, I will say that, if I can ever figure it out, it's the
> toolkit I intend to use.
> 
> I will also note that, like most of the Ruby community, they have come a
> LONG way in the past year.  There's a wiki with pretty robust-looking
> documentation and some decent tutorials at:
> 
> http://wxruby.rubyforge.org/wiki/wiki.pl
> 
> There are other GUI toolkits available, but I haven't explored them.
> Something called "FOX" exists.  There's a Qt toolkit that appears to
> have gotten to a usable alpha state in 2002 and then been abandoned.
> There may be others.
> 
> Good luck!
> 
> -dB
> 
> --
> David Brady
> ruby-talk / shinybit.com
> I'm having a really surreal day... OR AM I?
> 
> 
>