Nikolai Weibull wrote:
> Charles Steinman wrote:
>
> > Nikolai Weibull wrote:
>
> > > % python
> > > Python 2.3.5 (#1, Apr 28 2005, 14:11:32)
> > > [GCC 3.3.5-20050130 (Gentoo Linux 3.3.5.20050130-r1,
> > > ssp-3.3.5.20050130-1, pie- on linux2
> > > Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
> > > >>> quit
> > > >>> 'Use Ctrl-D (i.e. EOF) to exit.'
> > > >>>
> > > %
>
> > > Man, seriously.  That's so fucking funny.  Can't we make irb do
> > > something similar?  I really hate that irb quits on me when I write
> > > "quit" at the prompt.  I'd much rather have it exit on me on ^D only.  I
> > > especially like how they take the time to explain that ^D is EOF,
>
> > Just put "def exit() 'Use Ctrl-D (i.e. EOF) to exit.' end" in your
> > ..irbrc file. Then you'll never have to worry about it again.
>
> The problem isn't exit, but quit.

My bad. The "exit" in the Python response threw me off. You can do the
same with quit, though.

>
> > Personally, I don't have a problem with involuntarily typing "exit"
> > into IRB. Anyway, the exit method is part of the standard library, not
> > a function of IRB. I don't think changing it by default in IRB would be
> > a good thing.
>
> Hm, perhaps not.  One could give it a counter, so that if I type quit
> twice in a row it'll first warn me that I should be uisng ^D, and then
> the next time it'll actually quit,

I still don't understand why quit should be an exception to every other
method, including the functionally identical exit. And isn't
accidentally typing ^D about as easy as accidentally typing "quit"? It
seems actually easier to me, since it's only one off from a normal
capital D whereas "quit" is four letters long.