jennyw wrote:
> 
> Just an aside ...
> 
> In 1952, the idea of a human readable computer language was pretty radical.
> Remember, Hopper had been around since the days they flipped physical
> switches to program computers (talk about machine language!). Dr. Hopper
> also started the first compiler standardization project when COBOL first
> came out. COBOL may be yucky now, but think about how Ruby (as it is today)
> might be regarded in 50 years.
> 
> Hopper has also been credited with coining the term 'bug' as it relates to
> computers: http://www.lewhill.com/firstcomputerbug.html. There are
> references that say she wasn't the one to remove the actual bug, but her
> telling of the story probably helped the term enter regular use.
> 
> Hopper was also known for showing students what a nano-second was by showing
> them a length of wire that electricity could pass through in a nanosecond.
> 
> There's a lot of myth and legend surrounding "Amazing Grace". It'd be
> unfortunate for us to sum up her contribution to computing as "COBOL --
> yuck!" (I'm not saying that Furio implied this; it's just that I'd hate for
> that to be an impression some people go away with).
> 
> Hopper felt her greatest achievement was teaching.  She's also served as
> inspiration to many programmers, especially women who wanted a role model.
> There's a conference named for her: http://gracehopper.org/

IIRC, The first incarnation of COBOL was literally a quick hack done in
a few months purely as an interim language until the "real" COBOL was
ready. Unfortunately, either the "real" COBOL never saw the light of day
or by the time it emerged from committee everyone was already committed
to the interim version and wanted compatibility with it, so it never got
used. I cannot remember the details, I'm afraid. 

Hopper also has an Aegis destroyer named after her. I'm not sure, but I
believe it's the first US Navy warship named after a woman.

Larry