Joe Van Dyk wrote:
> 1)  Why one additional language isn't a bad thing

With one more language you have one more choice - which can be a good 
thing. Especially if this additional language makes solving the task at 
hand easier than another language. If you only know Perl & Java, then 
you'll end up using Perl and Java. But if, say, you need a device driver 
written? In this case you better also know C, perhaps.

So, to me it seems that you'll in fact 'need' several languages for 
different purposes. Administration tools, Numerical modelling, Web 
applications, desktop programs, device drivers... Whatever your task is, 
you better use an appropriate language for it. And a large company will 
very likely need more than 3 languages, I'm pretty sure. After all, 
there's a reason why there are thousands of languages (and language 
dialects) out there.

But using several languages to solve the same problems isn't a good idea 
either. And Ruby, Python and Perl do (try to) solve the same problems - 
at least to a certain amount.
So this is where the discussion really starts...

> 2)  Examples of existing Ruby usages in large scale applications

http://www.rubygarden.org/ruby?RealWorldRuby

might help you...

> 3)  How Ruby can benefit this place

Personally, I need to write less code (compared to Java, C++ and 
others), do write more unit tests (or actually write them for that 
matter) and get the job (mostly automated testing of other software, but 
developing 'real' software too) done.


Happy rubying

Stephan