ah, ruby is so convenient compared to other
languages:). This I guess is a legacy from my days of
C programming where you had to declare everything up
front to allocate space etc. I'll fix this in
Rubyforge asap. tyvm :)

rgds

Steve


--- "David A. Black" <dblack / wobblini.net> wrote:
> Hi --
> 
> On Wed, 18 May 2005, Steve Callaway wrote:
> 
> > Yeah, straightforward enough, moreover you can
> process
> > an array of vars as in the snippet I put up on
> > Rubyforge:
> >
> > # function to regexp vars
> > def is_element_in_string?(in_string, in_array)
> > in_array.each do |line|
> > rx_test = /#{line}/
> >            if  in_string =~ rx_test
> >                             return true
> >            end
> > end
> > return false
> > end
> 
> Let Ruby do the work for you :-)
> 
>    def is_element_in_string?(str, elements)
>      elements.any? {|e| /#{e}/.match(str) }
>    end
> 
> > # as an example we may wish to see whether a list
> of
> > football match results
> > # contains a result of a team we are interested in
> > varray = Array.new
> > # now populate the array with reegxps you wish to
> > match...
> > varray = ["Plymouth Argyle", "Blackburn Rovers" ,
> > "Manchester .*", "Tott.*"]
> 
> You're not populating the array; you're discarding
> the array and
> creating a completely new one :-)  The array you
> created previously
> ceases to exist.
> 
> You can either just leave out that first assignment,
> or if you have
> some reason to create and populate the array in two
> steps, you could
> do:
> 
>    varray = Array.new
>    varray.replace(["Plymouth ...", "...", ...])
> 
> but I can't think of any reason to do that.  I would
> just assign the
> array to the variable, as in your second assignment.
> 
> 
> David
> 
> -- 
> David A. Black
> dblack / wobblini.net
> 
> 


		
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