Yukihiro Matsumoto wrote:

[snip]

> 
> I think a few of them pass the test.  For example, I like the word
> "specific", but the term "specific class" seems to have different
> implication in the English language.  The "instance class" may cause
> confusion with the term "instance method".
> 
> So if I choose from above, candidates would be:
> 
>   - individual class / individual method (sounds nice; I don't think
>     of any confusion by the term; not sure how English speakers feel,
>     but I think I can trust Hal)
>   - uniclass (totally new term for new idea)
>   - singleton class / singleton method (yes, I still believe in
>     context ;-)
> 
> Thank you for participating.  We are still open.

I did not realize the list was so long.

Some of these I might like better than any of my own.

The problem with many/most of these is that they have common
English meanings and may not be recognized as jargon.

That is the case with "specific" and is likely the case with
"individual" too -- except that in English we rarely use
five syllables, except as jargon, when we can help it.

If you don't understand the distinction I am making between
"technical" usage and "normal" usage, consider the word
"regular" -- in normal usage it can mean "ordinary" but in
math or geometry it has a more specific meaning.

So in that sense, "individual" might still be a bad choice.
Matter of opinion.

It reminds me of the old days when BASIC was a common first
language. Sometimes a person would say, "I want to take a
basic programming class," and the other person would hear,
"I want to take a BASIC programming class" (or vice versa).


Hal