My recommendation would be fairly XP-ish: Don't worry about overall 
structure as much as getting features out. Evolve your code as you 
write it. Use lots of automated tests to make it safe for you to do 
radical changes mid-stream.

Most of the time, we don't have the luxury of knowing exactly what kind 
of software we want. And most of the time, getting to use it halfway 
changes our understanding of the problem.

So don't plan ahead. It's too easy to get AnalysisParalysis that way.

On Apr 21, 2005, at 5:57 PM, Hal Fulton wrote:

> Sometimes I stare at the monitor and think: Is it too late
> to change majors?
>
> I'm about to start a rewrite of Tycho in my <sarcasm>copious</sarcasm>
> spare time.
>
> For those curious about this tool, see
>   http://tycho.rubyforge.org
> or the RubyConf slides at
>   http://rubyhacker.com/tycho/slides
>
> The basic paradigm is a hierarchy of categories, each consisting
> of a pile of notes. But structuring the code in proper OO fashion
> is nontrivial in my view.
>
> I have spent much time scribbling on napkins and muttering MVC
> jargon to myself, but to little avail. I'm confused and my
> brain is itching.
>
> As one of the slides indicates, part of my confusion is different
> ways of thinking about what a "note" is.
>
> Sometimes I perceive it as:
>   - an object of a certain class
>   - the actual text of the note
>   - the text plus its metadata
>   - the YAML'd version of the text+metadata
>   - the key used to look up the record in the db
>   - the text field in which the text is displayed
>   - the parent widget to which that text field belongs
>   - or something else.
>
> I like the idea of composing an object of smaller objects --
> for example, store all the GUI stuff in note.widget or
> note.gui or something.
>
> But then (among other complications) the note has a title
> (note.title) which is also stored in the GUI (note.widget.title) --
> these must be kept in sync. :/  And so on.
>
> What are your mental (or other) tools for dealing with this sort
> of complexity?
>
>
> Thanks,
> Hal
>
>
>
>

Francis Hwang
http://fhwang.net/