Charles Steinman wrote:
> Hal Fulton wrote:
> 
>>Those are called "collective nouns." They appear singular but
>>act as a plural and should be treated plurally. Thus "Microsoft
>>are" is correct, and "Microsoft is" is a failure of the US
>>education system.
>>
>>I can see the rationale that a corporation is a single entity.
>>But when it's time for a pronoun, even Americans go for the
>>plural -- even in the same sentence:
>>
>>   "Microsoft are angry, and they plan to sue." (UK/correct)
>>   "Microsoft is angry, and it plans to sue." (at least consistent)
>>   "Microsoft is angry, and they plan to sue." (American)
> 
> 
> People talk that way, but these are the same people who say "between
> you and I." I'd say the second is correct, and Associated Press style
> (the most commonly used style guide for American newspapers)
> unequivocally says it's the second one.

It's the third one I really take exception to. And it's the one I
personally see most frequently.

Also, nearly everyone (in my experience) now says "between you and I."
I even heard it in _Finding Neverland_, where IMO it was surely inserted
by an American who thought it sounded "more elegant." And the same for
_Vanity Fair_.

But it does grate on my nerves that in essence all collective nouns
are now treated as singular -- especially when accompanied by a
plural pronoun with the same entity as antecedent.

> Sorry for the lack of topicness, y'all. I just had to defend my
> dialectical honor.

Consider it defended. :) Languages do change, after all. But I feel
compelled to fight some of the changes.

As for US vs. UK, well, all generalizations are wrong. There's nothing
that "all of us" or "all of them" say.

And the offtopicness was my fault.


Cheers,
Hal