Timothy Byrd wrote:
>>For example, they think "one hundred" is singular? Please.
>>
>>By the way, I hear that one hundred are expected at the
>>next Ruby Conf...  ;)
> 
> 
> Well, "one hundred" is a good number. ;)
> 
> (Going even more off topic.) That just reminded me of something.  In
> the US, the media refer to corporations in the singular - "Microsoft is
> a ...".  But I seem to recall reading British articles that use
> "Microsoft are going to ..."

Yes. Don't get me started.

Those are called "collective nouns." They appear singular but
act as a plural and should be treated plurally. Thus "Microsoft
are" is correct, and "Microsoft is" is a failure of the US
education system.

I can see the rationale that a corporation is a single entity.
But when it's time for a pronoun, even Americans go for the
plural -- even in the same sentence:

   "Microsoft are angry, and they plan to sue." (UK/correct)
   "Microsoft is angry, and it plans to sue." (at least consistent)
   "Microsoft is angry, and they plan to sue." (American)


Hal