This is an informal announcement of a possible position for
an intermediate programmer with 2-3 years of experience in
Ruby and C in the SF Bay Area.

We are not sure yet if we will hire a full-time permanent
person, or a part-time contractor for a 10 month project.
Salary level for the full-time permanent position would
likely be around 50-60K/year with university benefits. The
contract rate would be adjusted upwards accordingly, but
without benefits (AFAIK).

This is really just an early "heads up". You're welcome to
contact us, but the formal hiring process will probably not
start for several months, and is dependent on funding.

======
Skills
======

Ruby: 2 years, responsible for at least one project of >10K
       lines. (Strong Lisp/SmallTalk background may be an
       acceptable substitute.)

GUI:  Experienced with some GUI toolkit, pref. in Ruby.
       Completed at least one substantial GUI project.
       (We have used Fox and Tk in previous projects.)

C:    1 year of professional work in C is preferred.

Edu:  BA in CS/EE, or other field of engineering or science.

Also good to have:

* OpenGL

* Data modeling, database

* Experience working in science/engineering

* Interest or experience in traffic simulation (in
   particular, Paramics, though that's rather unlikely)

* Interest in future of public transit

* Some Windows development experience (MSVC). We develop for
   Windows, Linux, and Sun, but most users are on Windows.
   For this position, most development can be done on any
   platform that supports ruby and the selected GUI toolkit.

* Some basic web site design and programming.

================
Responsibilities
================

The project is to continue development of a tool for
modeling, simulation, and visualization of "bus rapid
transit" (BRT) systems
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bus_rapid_transit). We are
applying for FTA funding for about 10 months of work. Your
role on the project will round out a team of 2 or 3 others,
and will emphasize developing GUI tools that can be used by
transit planners to design models of transit corridors and
to conduct experiments based on simulations to evaluate the
effectiveness of BRT options. Corridor models are stored in
a hierarchical modeling languag called BRTML. Background on
the project is at http://path.berkeley.edu/SMARTBRT.
(There's software there, too, but it won't do anything
useful unless you have Paramics, which is an expensive
traffic simulation tool.) There will also be a GUI to
interact with the running simulations and display event
data, graphs, etc.

The organization is California PATH, UC Berkeley,
http://www.path.berkeley.edu, located at the Richmond Field
Station, a 20 minute drive from campus. We do transportation
research on a mix of federal, state, and industry funding,
with an emphasis on using new technologies to improve the
safety and performance of traffic and transit. Our group of
about 50-60 people interacts closely with faculty and
students in the College of Engineering. Sometimes we even
get on the evening news
(http://www2.cbs5.com/topstories/local_story_039192718.html).

PATH has an interesting mix of people: engineers
specializing in real-time systems, radios and wireless
networking, sensors, automotive control, human factors;
software people, both real-time and "soft"; automotive
safety researchers; applied mathematicians; cognitive
scientists. The organization is fairly flat and relaxed;
it's about halfway between an academic department and a
small engineering R&D company.

The biggest downside of working here is the cost of living
in the bay area, but you get what you pay for. Also, all of
our funding is soft, so even "permanent" employees have no
real job security (but turnover is very low).

-- 
Joel VanderWerf                          California PATH, UC Berkeley
mailto:vjoel / path.berkeley.edu                     Ph. (510) 231-9446
http://www.path.berkeley.edu                       FAX (510) 231-9565