Ghelani, Vidhi wrote:> Sent: Friday, February 11, 2005 12:08 PM
>
> Hey,
>
> "(btw. what os are you using?)" ...I am using windows xp. But the
> way I am working on this is, I connect to a secure shell network,
> using putty, and I am connect using an IP address of a linux
> machine. Now, is there any way I could work on this using windows itself?

Did you install using the one-click installer?

If so then you've got a number of tools at your disposal (see the Ruby entry
in your start menu). For irb, just open a command window and execute the
command "irb". This will put you in an environment where each line of Ruby
code you type will be executed when you press enter,

Curt



> Thanks,
> Vidhi.
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Brian Schröäer [mailto:ruby / brian-schroeder.de]
> Sent: Friday, February 11, 2005 10:00 AM
> To: ruby-talk ML
> Subject: Re: new to this language
>
> On Sat, 12 Feb 2005 02:46:52 +0900
> "Ghelani, Vidhi" <vidhi.ghelani / intel.com> wrote:
>
> > Hey ,
> >
> > How do I get IRB?? How is this different from using SSH ?
>
> chances are good it is installed together with the ruby
> interpreter. Just try to enter irb at the command line. (btw.
> what os are you using?)
>
> It has got nothing to do with ssh. I'll show you a typical irb session:
>
> ---
> bschroed@black:~$ irb
> irb(main):001:0> 1+5
> => 6
> irb(main):002:0> 3.times do puts "welcome to ruby" end
> welcome to ruby
> welcome to ruby
> welcome to ruby
> => 3
> irb(main):003:0> require 'complex'
> => true
> irb(main):004:0> I = Complex.new(0, 1)
> => Complex(0, 1)
> irb(main):005:0> 12 + I
> => Complex(12, 1)
> irb(main):006:0> (12 + I) * (2 - I)
> => Complex(25, -10)
> irb(main):007:0> exit
> bschroed@black:~$
> ---
>
> >
> > Also, can I have different classes in a file, that are not
> subclasses of one another? Using your example, could I have a
> class in that file that was not a subclass of Greet?
>
> Yes you can. Seems it was not such a good example.
>
> I recommend:
> http://www.ruby-doc.org/docs/ProgrammingRuby/
> http://www.ruby-doc.org/docbar/
>
> and buy the dead tree version of the pickaxe second edition.
>
> regards,
>
> Brian
>
> >
> > Thanks,
> > Vidhi.
> >
>
>
>
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Brian Schröäer [mailto:ruby / brian-schroeder.de]
> > Sent: Friday, February 11, 2005 9:37 AM
> > To: ruby-talk ML
> > Subject: Re: new to this language
> >
> > On Sat, 12 Feb 2005 02:15:18 +0900
> > Jim Menard <jimm / io.com> wrote:
> >
> > > Vidhi,
> > >
> > > Welcome to Ruby.
> > >
> > > > 1) Just like in C++ you have a .h and a .cpp file , In this
> language how
> > > > would you store your file. In other words if I open emacs
> and want to
> > > > write a very simple small class in what format would I save
> this file ?
> > >
> > > You store all your code in .rb files. There is no separate
> header file. You
> > > declare and define a class in one place, just like in Java.
> (That's not
> > > strictly true; in Ruby you can "re-open" a class and add more
> methods later.
> > > Don't worry about that yet.)
> > >
> > > superclass.rb:
> > >
> > > 	class Superclass
> > > 		attr_accessor :super_instance_var
> > > 		def initialize
> > > 			@super_instance_var = 42
> > > 		end
> > > 	end
> > >
> > > myclass.rb
> > >
> > > 	require 'superclass'
> > >
> > > 	class MyClass < Superclass
> > > 		attr_accessor :my_instance_var
> > > 		def initialize
> > > 			@my_instance_var = 'hello'
> > > 		end
> > > 	end
> > >
> > > another.rb
> > >
> > > 	require 'myclass'
> > >
> > > 	mc = MyClass.new
> > > 	puts mc.my_instance_var
> > > 	puts mc.super_instance_var
> > >
> > > > 2) How do you compile your code? What is the syntax?
> > >
> > > Ruby is an interpreted language, which means that it doesn't
> need to be
> > > compiled before you run it. To run "another.rb" above, type
> > >
> > > 	ruby another.rb
> > >
> > > > 3) Do you need a main and a makefile ? I am sure you would
> need a main
> > > > to test it . If yes how do you save the main? In what format?
> > >
> > > You don't need a main method. All Ruby code is executed as it
> is seen by the
> > > interpreter. Some of the code above (superclass.rb and
> myclass.rb) define
> > > classes and some of the code (another.rb) creates an instance
> of a class and
> > > prints some output.
> > >
> >
> > one thing I want to add, is that you need not create a seperate
> file per class. You can as well group classes by functionality
> and put multiple classes in one file. (I think using one file per
> class is a java idiom).
> >
> >
> > first.rb
> > class Greet
> >   def initialize(name)
> >     @name = name
> >   end
> > end
> >
> > class GreetEnglish < Greet
> >   def greetme
> >     puts "Hello #{name}"
> >   end
> > end
> >
> > class GreetGerman < Greet
> >   def greetme
> >     puts "Hallo #{name}"
> >   end
> > end
> >
> > class GreetSpanish < Greet
> >   def greetme
> >     puts "Hola #{name}"
> >   end
> > end
> >
> > greeters = [GreetEnglish, GreetGerman, GreetSpanish]
> > greeter = greeters[rand(greeters.length)].new
> > greeter.greet
> >
> > is perfectly reasonable and allowed. (Though maybe not two good
> design, and you can shorten this alot when you have learned about
> dynamic programming).
> >
> > And additionally, if you want to play with the language use
> irb, the ruby interactive shell.
> >
> > good luck and enjoy ruby,
> >
> > Brian
> >
> >
>
>
> --
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