Hi,

On Sat, 12 Feb 2005 03:10:50 +0900, Ghelani, Vidhi
<vidhi.ghelani / intel.com> wrote:
> Hey,
> 
> OH ...I get it now !!! yipeee....this makes so much more sense!

That's cool, nonetheless. :-) Fun. :-)

> 
> Cheers,
> Vidhi
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Forrest Chang [mailto:fkchang2000 / yahoo.com]
> Sent: Friday, February 11, 2005 10:00 AM
> To: ruby-talk ML
> Subject: Re: new to this language
> 
> Hi Vidhi:
> 
>   You mentioned being only somewhat familiar with
> C++/Java, but what Joao mentioned, is basically the
> functional equivalent of a main() in a Java class.
> This allows you to run the file by itself, i.e. ruby
> file.rb, and allow you to easily reuse the contents in
> another file, i.e.
> 
> (hello.rb)
> def hello
>   puts "hello"
> end
> 
> if $0 == __FILE__
>   hello
> end
> 
> so you run it and you get
> prompt> ruby hello.rb
> hello
> 
> Compilation finished at Fri Feb 11 09:58:52
> 
> so now you want to reuse the contents of hello.rb
> (beatles.rb)
> require "hello"
> 
> def song_chorus
>   hello
>   puts "goodbye"
> end
> if $0 == __FILE__
>   song_chorus
> end
> 
> you run this file and get a
> 
> hello
> goodbye
> 
>   Hope this helps.
> 
> Forrest
> --- Joao Pedrosa <joaopedrosa / gmail.com> wrote:
> 
> > Hi,
> >
> > > > 3) Do you need a main and a makefile ? I am sure
> > you would need a main
> > > > to test it . If yes how do you save the main? In
> > what format?
> > >
> > > You don't need a main method. All Ruby code is
> > executed as it is seen by the
> > > interpreter. Some of the code above (superclass.rb
> > and myclass.rb) define
> > > classes and some of the code (another.rb) creates
> > an instance of a class and
> > > prints some output.
> >
> > Else, you can use
> >
> > if __FILE__ == $0
> >   p 'Hello World!'
> > end
> >
> > In any file so the code in the if-block will be
> > executed only if the
> > file is being run directly by the interpreter (e.g.:
> > ruby
> > hello_world.rb). It's useful so you can have a file
> > that behaves like
> > a library and a program, depending on how it's
> > loaded. You load a
> > library with the require (or load) command (e.g.:
> > require 'open-uri').
> >
> > I like to use such capability to test one or another
> > thing in a file
> > while I'm working on it.
> >
> > Welcome to Ruby.
> >
> > Cheers,
> > Joao
> >
> >
> 
> 

Regards,
Joao