"Bill Kelly" <billk / cts.com> writes:
> Many of us have exactly 1 employee in our companies.
> But just look at the big boys, like Adobe, Electronic
> Arts, Microsoft...  Plenty of lawyers.  Plenty of problems
> with piracy???  You bet.

This is my point.  If they, with all their resources and lawyerage,
can't stop it, how can you possibly hope to?  I guarantee they have
many more, and smarter, people than you or I working on it, and they
still can't stop pirates.  To me, this suggests it's a mug's game, but
YMMV. :)

> If you have actually worked in this field, producing low
> cost "shrink wrap" software products, and you don't have
> a problem with piracy, I would love to know more about
> your approach.

It's not a matter of not having a problem with piracy, it's keeping
that problem down to a manageable level.  Take iTunes, for instance:
you can't tell me that even with the RIAA suing dead people for
copyright infringement, that I couldn't find a download of nearly any
pop tune I cared to if I tried hard enough.  So how do they make
money?  By pricing product at a level that even though people could
pirate it, they look at it and say, "Yeah, I could steal that song,
but hey, it's only a buck, why not?"

In any event, the problem is that, at least with ruby, you can't get
there from here.  There simply is no way to run ruby code without
giving the OS, and thus the user, permission to read it.  You can't
get there with C# or Java either, but you can pretend a little while
longer, if you like.

-=Eric
-- 
Come to think of it, there are already a million monkeys on a million
typewriters, and Usenet is NOTHING like Shakespeare.
		-- Blair Houghton.