From: "Eric Schwartz" <emschwar / pobox.com>
> Michael Gebhart <mail / miketech.net> writes:
> > Yes, sure you are right. But one example: I wanna have a registration code
> > in my application. The user gets a code to activate some more features. In
> > the code, there only is a flag reg=true/false. When the code is entered,
> > the application checks it and sets the variable to true, or false. The
> > user can now take a look at my code and simply change this part. After the
> > check he sets: reg=true.
> 
> If your customers are thieves, then you should sue them.  Or get
> better customers.  Or both, possibly.

It just doesn't work that way.  At least not in the realm
of video games and other relatively low-cost "shrink wrap"
software.

> > Ok, now you can say: registration codes are ugly and everything has to be
> > opened :) Sure, but if it is a commercial project, there is no other way. 
> 
> If it is a commercial project, then you should get yourself some good
> lawyers (you should have them anyway), and have them scare the holy
> bejeezus out of anyone tempted to steal from you.  The fact is, this
> is the only recourse you truly have, in the end.

Many of us have exactly 1 employee in our companies.
But just look at the big boys, like Adobe, Electronic
Arts, Microsoft...  Plenty of lawyers.  Plenty of problems
with piracy???  You bet.

> > I only could appeal to the users forthrightness.
> 
> And their lack of desire to be sued.  Consider: most customers don't
> want to steal from you-- if they get $X of value from your software,
> and you charge them $X-$epsilon, as long as epsilon is sufficiently
> large, everybody's happy.

My current employer (my paying job :) makes software that
is very highly rated by its users.  Nevertheless, people 
distribute cracked registration passwords--and it's not
to "demo" the software, because this software has a very
liberal trial period.  Every day we see torrents of people
who allow our software to check our website for updates
(we aren't sneaky about the checks, btw) and who we can
tell are using cracked passwords.

If you have actually worked in this field, producing low
cost "shrink wrap" software products, and you don't have
a problem with piracy, I would love to know more about
your approach.


Regards,

Bill