Michael Gebhart <mail / miketech.net> writes:
> Yes, sure you are right. But one example: I wanna have a registration code
> in my application. The user gets a code to activate some more features. In
> the code, there only is a flag reg=true/false. When the code is entered,
> the application checks it and sets the variable to true, or false. The
> user can now take a look at my code and simply change this part. After the
> check he sets: reg=true.

If your customers are thieves, then you should sue them.  Or get
better customers.  Or both, possibly.

> Ok, now you can say: registration codes are ugly and everything has to be
> opened :) Sure, but if it is a commercial project, there is no other way. 

If it is a commercial project, then you should get yourself some good
lawyers (you should have them anyway), and have them scare the holy
bejeezus out of anyone tempted to steal from you.  The fact is, this
is the only recourse you truly have, in the end.

> I only could appeal to the users forthrightness.

And their lack of desire to be sued.  Consider: most customers don't
want to steal from you-- if they get $X of value from your software,
and you charge them $X-$epsilon, as long as epsilon is sufficiently
large, everybody's happy.

> And yes: With Java I had the same problem. And with C# I will have it too.
> But: I thought Microsoft would develop their applications in C# too. But
> then the users also can see the code. Maybe Microsoft will keep on using
> C++ for the huge projects? And only use C# for not important parts? 

It doesn't matter; people can decompile C++ as well.  In the end, the
lawyers are the only ones who can do anything about it.

-=Eric
-- 
Come to think of it, there are already a million monkeys on a million
typewriters, and Usenet is NOTHING like Shakespeare.
		-- Blair Houghton.