Project namespaces, text file back-end, interesting architecture,
impressive development talent behind it.

Also, it's the only ruby wiki I see with the design goal of
'"extensible", which is very important to me. I think that for many
corporate needs, a wiki needs to be extended to fit to problem being
solved- e.g. with some CMS and workflow capabilities. By my general
use of the web, there seems to be as many failed wiki's as blogs.
Well, maybe not quite as many, but I'd say 90% of wikis I encounter
are a disaster or mostly empty.

Finally, I have a lot of personal ideas I'd like to hack on top of wiki.

I don't see any alternatives in the Ruby space for those needs. Maybe
Instiki in six months, but that depends on where it's development
heads. The other option is to go with a non-Ruby wiki, but I'd rather
suffer features and have the opportunity to extend my Ruby skills, and
maybe contribute to a Ruby project.

Nick

On Tue, 25 Jan 2005 12:35:51 +0900, itsme213 <itsme213 / hotmail.com> wrote:
> 
> "Nicholas Van Weerdenburg" <vanweerd / gmail.com> wrote in message
> 
> > > > Any tips for using  RuWiki in a corporate setting, e.g. logons and/or
> > > > Ldap connectivity?
> 
> Nicholas,
> 
> Could you share some of your reasons for choosing RuWiki? It might help some
> others (like me) who are interested as well.
> 
> Thanks.
> 
>